I want my apples to go brown!

March 23rd, 2015

And you should too.

You have the right to know what is in your food, where it comes from and if it has been “genetically modified.”

Here is what the dictionary says genetically modified means,

“genetically modified |jəˈnetik(ə)lē ˈmädəˌfīd| (abbr.: GM)
adjective (of an organism or crop) containing genetic material that has been artificially altered so as to produce a desired characteristic: genetically modified viruses to insert new genes into growing plants.”

Inserting genes into the plants that grow my food? Artificially altering my food? Genetically modified viruses?

Does that sound healthy?

The Arctic Apple-two decades in the making? Seriously? It took nature how long to create the original apple?

The article I have attached speaks solely from a dollar point of view. It does not speak to the educated Canadian consumer who wants to know what they are eating before they purchase it, especially GMO foods. What is wrong and unfair is most of us are still not sure what GMO means. Many illnesses, diseases, gastrointestinal, food sensitivities and severe life threatening allergies are directly linked to GMO foods. Why give this kind of food the right to be there when many of us do not want it.

I want my apples to go brown naturally, it is a sign that it is approaching the expiration date that nature intended on giving us, to know when the food is no longer good for human consumption. So why eat apples that never let you know when it is expired and is no longer a valid source of nutrition?

Here is what the founder of these apples has to say, is this complete arrogance or only his right to know, not yours.

“We are not going to label it as a GMO,” said their founder Neal Carter in an interview with Global News.

“We have spent a lot of time and money and effort to prove that this product is as safe as any other apple.”

As for his money and time spent on his “frankenfruit” that is his problem, not yours to consume. This is not food you should be testing or paying for on his behalf to see if it is good for you or dangerous to your health. Why is Heath Canada approving this?

Arctic apple vs. an apple, click on the image to see the video.

My Ontario grown Spartan apple went slightly brown after 30 minutes, it still tasted great!

Lastly, you have to ask yourself. If the food was safe to begin with, why did he spend so much time to try and prove his theory that it is safe? Maybe this is because this kind of food is not, we my need 20-50 years of human consumption to realize the impact. Time to see what it does to us and our food system. Why rush into anything that is so uncertain?

We need to keep Heritage varieties filling our orchards and our fridges, apples that have survived for hundreds of years providing us with whole nutrition.

Are you ready to be his “GMO” tester?

You can avoid foods that are not labelled GMO, by eating organic, local organic, non-GMO and seasonally grown foods that are grown locally. Is it not odd that we have to label Organic foods but here is no law that says we have to label GMO foods.

Fred Steele, the other farmer in the article may be right about the impact on all apple growers, many of us including myself may buy less apples in the future because of the lack of good, honest labeling.

Food for thought.

Stacey Fokas

References-By Neetu Garcha- Reporter for Global News, March 23rd 2015.

 

Hockey Hydration and Nutrition

March 10th, 2015

Thank you Coach Johanne and Caledon Coyotes Atom Rep Girls for having me out for the night!

I have been tucked away for quite some time working on my next project but could not resist the opportunity to get out and enjoy the company of  young, inspiring hockey players and having the opportunity to share my passion about eating healthy and hydrating for a sport I love!

We certainly had a great time talking about how important it is to have healthy, hydrating and nutritious snacks to take “on the go.” We all know how physically demanding hockey can be, let alone all the planning it takes to stay hydrated by way of fresh fruits and vegetables (not just sports drinks). As well we talked about nutritious snacks packed with energy from nature that can be eaten before and after the game.

We prepared fresh fruit smoothies with hemp hearts, fresh apples, bananas, frozen berries and coconut milk.  At some point we threw in baby spinach, the girls did notice and screamed “no!” but kept coming back for more!

We learned how to pack our own healthy “grab and go” nutritious snacks with a homemade granola recipe my kids love, and gave them the option to add raw pumpkin seeds, dried cranberries and cashews. These can be made in advance for them to grab on the way out to a game or a practice. Easy to transport and seriously delicious!

We talked about healthy options like cooked barley, and fresh vege sticks with hummus. I prepared a very large bowl of fruit salad with Organic honey and fresh mint that they absolutely loved!

The night was packed with questions and positive comments along with a high level of enthusiasm of and a keen interest in how to eat healthier before and after games and practices. Simple ideas were shared to help engage the girls in helping prepare healthy, hydrating and nutritious foods in advance.

The granola recipe was such a big hit and I am thrilled they all loved it, so here is the recipe.

Caledon Granola “on the go”

Preheat oven to 255 degree F. *Mix these ingredients in a large bowl, spread onto two baking trays lined with parchment paper. *Bake for 1 hour and fifteen minutes or until dry and golden. Move granola around with a wooden spoon every 15-20 minutes for even browning. *Cool granola in a large bowl, and then add the raw ingredients below to finish off your granola. 2 cups large oats 1 cup of quick oats 1/4 cup of dark brown sugar (packed) 1/4 cup sunflower oil (or coconut oil) 1/4 cup of maple syrup 1 cup shredded coconut (sweetened or unsweetened) 2 pinches of sea salt Set aside these ingredients for after the granola bakes 1/2 cup of raw pumpkin seeds 1/2 cup pecans broken into 4's (or 1/2 cup cashews) 1/2 cup of dried cranberries Store granola in an airtight glass jar. This granola is perfect for “on the go” or eaten as a breakfast cereal with your favourite unsweetened beverage.

Preheat oven to 255 degree F.

*Mix the first set of ingredients in a large bowl, spread onto two  baking trays lined with parchment paper.
*Bake for 1 hour and fifteen minutes or until dry and golden. Move granola around with a wooden spoon every 15-20 minutes for even browning.
*Cool oat mixture in a large bowl, and then add the raw ingredients below to finish off your granola.

2 cups large oats
1 cup of quick oats
1/4 cup of dark brown sugar (packed)
1/4 cup sunflower oil (or coconut oil)
1/4 cup of maple syrup
1 cup shredded coconut (sweetened or unsweetened)
2 pinches of sea salt

Set aside these ingredients for after the granola bakes

1/2 cup of raw pumpkin seeds
1/2 cup pecans broken into 4′s (or 1/2 cup cashews)
1/2 cup of dried cranberries

Recipe Stacey Fokas-freshalicious®

Store granola in an airtight glass jar.

This granola is perfect for “on the go” or eaten as a breakfast cereal with your favourite unsweetened beverage.

Thank you Caledon Coyotes for having me out for the evening.

Source your ingredients locally and organic.

Stacey

Warm up to your honey this Christmas!

December 16th, 2014

What a delicious time of the year!

Christmas is about family and food. Roasted squashes, turkeys, hams and baked goods galore! Locally sourced of course off our farms, organic if you like. Farm fresh eggs for baking, locally milled flours and of course Canadian Maple Syrup along with our precious honey that was collected most recently.

Cloves, cinnamon, cardamom and molasses…..and ginger mmm. Sage, thyme, cracked pepper is all you need to spice up your Christmas dinner. Keep it simple and as local as you can this Christmas in appreciation for our local farmers, the food and the resources used to get the food to your table.

Try using honey in your recipes this Christmas, not only in your cakes and cookies, but makes a great dip when warmed slightly for apples, crackers and tastes great on toast with a hint of cinnamon!

Simple, delicious

Cheers!

Stacey